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More Mind-Blowing Pizza Tossing Makes It to the Internet

More Mind-Blowing Pizza Tossing Makes It to the Internet


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A pizza tosser combines basketball moves, dancing, juggling, and pizza dough

iStockphoto/Thinkstock

Sure, that 7-year-old pizza tosser from Carmine Pizza Factory was kind of amazing two months ago, but in Internet time that's like a year ago. Once he learns to do these stunts, we'll give him top billing again.

A pizza tosser schools eaters on how to toss pizza dough like a pro, showing off his mad skills by combining moves you see in basketball music videos and juggling shows. Sadly, there isn't any information on where this guy actually works, but it's worth watching if only to try to rip off some moves.

The result? He pulls off a bunch of over-the-shoulder, under-the-leg, behind-the-back tosses. Watch the entire mind-blowing and very impressive video below, although Buzzfeed got it right when they noted that no one wants to eat that dough afterward. Unless he's wearing gloves? Your move, Carmine kid.

Jessica Chou is an associate editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @jesschou.


Why is pizza so damn vilified?

Maybe you’ve seen the near constant stream of corporate body shaming campaigns and internet memes deeming the COVID-19 crisis a mass fattening, rather than the pulmonary pandemic that is killing people by the hundreds and thousands each day. If you haven’t, I envy you.

The self-flagellation is getting old. Human beings cannot exist without calories, and some humans require more calories than others, and quarantine is the perfect time to make peace with this concept. If there is an ideal moment to enjoy the food you eat and be comforted by it, it’s weeks deep into these stay-at-home orders.

One food myth that has always chapped my ass is the notion that eating pizza is the enemy of health. I’m an Italian American, and the tendency to classify pizza as some major, sinful indulgence just gets on my nerves, especially because pizza, when prepared almost everywhere except major chain restaurants, isn’t all that horrifically unhealthy.

As immigration to the U.S. from impoverished Southern Italy soared in the early 20th century (right around the time the world was recovering from the 1918 pandemic), American pizza was born. Though once an ethnic Italian dish, it eventually became an emblem of New York’s working-class melting pot, enjoyed by just about everyone. Now, of course, it’s also mass-produced by huge corporations who have entire supply chains dedicated to keeping markups—and preservative content—high.

Those corporate pizzas (and the corporate ad dollars that keep them top of mind) taint our overall view of this very important food group. The rich culinary history of pizza is unfairly rolled into a narrow category of super-caloric pies, flattening all its nuance. Mind you, there’s a time and a place for fast food pizza, too, grease and all. But the more storied varieties, many of which I grew up eating in New York City (shoutout to Nunzio’s!), are downright fine foods and deserve distinction. So let’s mount a defense of pizza, here and now. In these times, we need as much joy as we can grab, and if it comes by the slice, all the better.


Why is pizza so damn vilified?

Maybe you’ve seen the near constant stream of corporate body shaming campaigns and internet memes deeming the COVID-19 crisis a mass fattening, rather than the pulmonary pandemic that is killing people by the hundreds and thousands each day. If you haven’t, I envy you.

The self-flagellation is getting old. Human beings cannot exist without calories, and some humans require more calories than others, and quarantine is the perfect time to make peace with this concept. If there is an ideal moment to enjoy the food you eat and be comforted by it, it’s weeks deep into these stay-at-home orders.

One food myth that has always chapped my ass is the notion that eating pizza is the enemy of health. I’m an Italian American, and the tendency to classify pizza as some major, sinful indulgence just gets on my nerves, especially because pizza, when prepared almost everywhere except major chain restaurants, isn’t all that horrifically unhealthy.

As immigration to the U.S. from impoverished Southern Italy soared in the early 20th century (right around the time the world was recovering from the 1918 pandemic), American pizza was born. Though once an ethnic Italian dish, it eventually became an emblem of New York’s working-class melting pot, enjoyed by just about everyone. Now, of course, it’s also mass-produced by huge corporations who have entire supply chains dedicated to keeping markups—and preservative content—high.

Those corporate pizzas (and the corporate ad dollars that keep them top of mind) taint our overall view of this very important food group. The rich culinary history of pizza is unfairly rolled into a narrow category of super-caloric pies, flattening all its nuance. Mind you, there’s a time and a place for fast food pizza, too, grease and all. But the more storied varieties, many of which I grew up eating in New York City (shoutout to Nunzio’s!), are downright fine foods and deserve distinction. So let’s mount a defense of pizza, here and now. In these times, we need as much joy as we can grab, and if it comes by the slice, all the better.


Why is pizza so damn vilified?

Maybe you’ve seen the near constant stream of corporate body shaming campaigns and internet memes deeming the COVID-19 crisis a mass fattening, rather than the pulmonary pandemic that is killing people by the hundreds and thousands each day. If you haven’t, I envy you.

The self-flagellation is getting old. Human beings cannot exist without calories, and some humans require more calories than others, and quarantine is the perfect time to make peace with this concept. If there is an ideal moment to enjoy the food you eat and be comforted by it, it’s weeks deep into these stay-at-home orders.

One food myth that has always chapped my ass is the notion that eating pizza is the enemy of health. I’m an Italian American, and the tendency to classify pizza as some major, sinful indulgence just gets on my nerves, especially because pizza, when prepared almost everywhere except major chain restaurants, isn’t all that horrifically unhealthy.

As immigration to the U.S. from impoverished Southern Italy soared in the early 20th century (right around the time the world was recovering from the 1918 pandemic), American pizza was born. Though once an ethnic Italian dish, it eventually became an emblem of New York’s working-class melting pot, enjoyed by just about everyone. Now, of course, it’s also mass-produced by huge corporations who have entire supply chains dedicated to keeping markups—and preservative content—high.

Those corporate pizzas (and the corporate ad dollars that keep them top of mind) taint our overall view of this very important food group. The rich culinary history of pizza is unfairly rolled into a narrow category of super-caloric pies, flattening all its nuance. Mind you, there’s a time and a place for fast food pizza, too, grease and all. But the more storied varieties, many of which I grew up eating in New York City (shoutout to Nunzio’s!), are downright fine foods and deserve distinction. So let’s mount a defense of pizza, here and now. In these times, we need as much joy as we can grab, and if it comes by the slice, all the better.


Why is pizza so damn vilified?

Maybe you’ve seen the near constant stream of corporate body shaming campaigns and internet memes deeming the COVID-19 crisis a mass fattening, rather than the pulmonary pandemic that is killing people by the hundreds and thousands each day. If you haven’t, I envy you.

The self-flagellation is getting old. Human beings cannot exist without calories, and some humans require more calories than others, and quarantine is the perfect time to make peace with this concept. If there is an ideal moment to enjoy the food you eat and be comforted by it, it’s weeks deep into these stay-at-home orders.

One food myth that has always chapped my ass is the notion that eating pizza is the enemy of health. I’m an Italian American, and the tendency to classify pizza as some major, sinful indulgence just gets on my nerves, especially because pizza, when prepared almost everywhere except major chain restaurants, isn’t all that horrifically unhealthy.

As immigration to the U.S. from impoverished Southern Italy soared in the early 20th century (right around the time the world was recovering from the 1918 pandemic), American pizza was born. Though once an ethnic Italian dish, it eventually became an emblem of New York’s working-class melting pot, enjoyed by just about everyone. Now, of course, it’s also mass-produced by huge corporations who have entire supply chains dedicated to keeping markups—and preservative content—high.

Those corporate pizzas (and the corporate ad dollars that keep them top of mind) taint our overall view of this very important food group. The rich culinary history of pizza is unfairly rolled into a narrow category of super-caloric pies, flattening all its nuance. Mind you, there’s a time and a place for fast food pizza, too, grease and all. But the more storied varieties, many of which I grew up eating in New York City (shoutout to Nunzio’s!), are downright fine foods and deserve distinction. So let’s mount a defense of pizza, here and now. In these times, we need as much joy as we can grab, and if it comes by the slice, all the better.


Why is pizza so damn vilified?

Maybe you’ve seen the near constant stream of corporate body shaming campaigns and internet memes deeming the COVID-19 crisis a mass fattening, rather than the pulmonary pandemic that is killing people by the hundreds and thousands each day. If you haven’t, I envy you.

The self-flagellation is getting old. Human beings cannot exist without calories, and some humans require more calories than others, and quarantine is the perfect time to make peace with this concept. If there is an ideal moment to enjoy the food you eat and be comforted by it, it’s weeks deep into these stay-at-home orders.

One food myth that has always chapped my ass is the notion that eating pizza is the enemy of health. I’m an Italian American, and the tendency to classify pizza as some major, sinful indulgence just gets on my nerves, especially because pizza, when prepared almost everywhere except major chain restaurants, isn’t all that horrifically unhealthy.

As immigration to the U.S. from impoverished Southern Italy soared in the early 20th century (right around the time the world was recovering from the 1918 pandemic), American pizza was born. Though once an ethnic Italian dish, it eventually became an emblem of New York’s working-class melting pot, enjoyed by just about everyone. Now, of course, it’s also mass-produced by huge corporations who have entire supply chains dedicated to keeping markups—and preservative content—high.

Those corporate pizzas (and the corporate ad dollars that keep them top of mind) taint our overall view of this very important food group. The rich culinary history of pizza is unfairly rolled into a narrow category of super-caloric pies, flattening all its nuance. Mind you, there’s a time and a place for fast food pizza, too, grease and all. But the more storied varieties, many of which I grew up eating in New York City (shoutout to Nunzio’s!), are downright fine foods and deserve distinction. So let’s mount a defense of pizza, here and now. In these times, we need as much joy as we can grab, and if it comes by the slice, all the better.


Why is pizza so damn vilified?

Maybe you’ve seen the near constant stream of corporate body shaming campaigns and internet memes deeming the COVID-19 crisis a mass fattening, rather than the pulmonary pandemic that is killing people by the hundreds and thousands each day. If you haven’t, I envy you.

The self-flagellation is getting old. Human beings cannot exist without calories, and some humans require more calories than others, and quarantine is the perfect time to make peace with this concept. If there is an ideal moment to enjoy the food you eat and be comforted by it, it’s weeks deep into these stay-at-home orders.

One food myth that has always chapped my ass is the notion that eating pizza is the enemy of health. I’m an Italian American, and the tendency to classify pizza as some major, sinful indulgence just gets on my nerves, especially because pizza, when prepared almost everywhere except major chain restaurants, isn’t all that horrifically unhealthy.

As immigration to the U.S. from impoverished Southern Italy soared in the early 20th century (right around the time the world was recovering from the 1918 pandemic), American pizza was born. Though once an ethnic Italian dish, it eventually became an emblem of New York’s working-class melting pot, enjoyed by just about everyone. Now, of course, it’s also mass-produced by huge corporations who have entire supply chains dedicated to keeping markups—and preservative content—high.

Those corporate pizzas (and the corporate ad dollars that keep them top of mind) taint our overall view of this very important food group. The rich culinary history of pizza is unfairly rolled into a narrow category of super-caloric pies, flattening all its nuance. Mind you, there’s a time and a place for fast food pizza, too, grease and all. But the more storied varieties, many of which I grew up eating in New York City (shoutout to Nunzio’s!), are downright fine foods and deserve distinction. So let’s mount a defense of pizza, here and now. In these times, we need as much joy as we can grab, and if it comes by the slice, all the better.


Why is pizza so damn vilified?

Maybe you’ve seen the near constant stream of corporate body shaming campaigns and internet memes deeming the COVID-19 crisis a mass fattening, rather than the pulmonary pandemic that is killing people by the hundreds and thousands each day. If you haven’t, I envy you.

The self-flagellation is getting old. Human beings cannot exist without calories, and some humans require more calories than others, and quarantine is the perfect time to make peace with this concept. If there is an ideal moment to enjoy the food you eat and be comforted by it, it’s weeks deep into these stay-at-home orders.

One food myth that has always chapped my ass is the notion that eating pizza is the enemy of health. I’m an Italian American, and the tendency to classify pizza as some major, sinful indulgence just gets on my nerves, especially because pizza, when prepared almost everywhere except major chain restaurants, isn’t all that horrifically unhealthy.

As immigration to the U.S. from impoverished Southern Italy soared in the early 20th century (right around the time the world was recovering from the 1918 pandemic), American pizza was born. Though once an ethnic Italian dish, it eventually became an emblem of New York’s working-class melting pot, enjoyed by just about everyone. Now, of course, it’s also mass-produced by huge corporations who have entire supply chains dedicated to keeping markups—and preservative content—high.

Those corporate pizzas (and the corporate ad dollars that keep them top of mind) taint our overall view of this very important food group. The rich culinary history of pizza is unfairly rolled into a narrow category of super-caloric pies, flattening all its nuance. Mind you, there’s a time and a place for fast food pizza, too, grease and all. But the more storied varieties, many of which I grew up eating in New York City (shoutout to Nunzio’s!), are downright fine foods and deserve distinction. So let’s mount a defense of pizza, here and now. In these times, we need as much joy as we can grab, and if it comes by the slice, all the better.


Why is pizza so damn vilified?

Maybe you’ve seen the near constant stream of corporate body shaming campaigns and internet memes deeming the COVID-19 crisis a mass fattening, rather than the pulmonary pandemic that is killing people by the hundreds and thousands each day. If you haven’t, I envy you.

The self-flagellation is getting old. Human beings cannot exist without calories, and some humans require more calories than others, and quarantine is the perfect time to make peace with this concept. If there is an ideal moment to enjoy the food you eat and be comforted by it, it’s weeks deep into these stay-at-home orders.

One food myth that has always chapped my ass is the notion that eating pizza is the enemy of health. I’m an Italian American, and the tendency to classify pizza as some major, sinful indulgence just gets on my nerves, especially because pizza, when prepared almost everywhere except major chain restaurants, isn’t all that horrifically unhealthy.

As immigration to the U.S. from impoverished Southern Italy soared in the early 20th century (right around the time the world was recovering from the 1918 pandemic), American pizza was born. Though once an ethnic Italian dish, it eventually became an emblem of New York’s working-class melting pot, enjoyed by just about everyone. Now, of course, it’s also mass-produced by huge corporations who have entire supply chains dedicated to keeping markups—and preservative content—high.

Those corporate pizzas (and the corporate ad dollars that keep them top of mind) taint our overall view of this very important food group. The rich culinary history of pizza is unfairly rolled into a narrow category of super-caloric pies, flattening all its nuance. Mind you, there’s a time and a place for fast food pizza, too, grease and all. But the more storied varieties, many of which I grew up eating in New York City (shoutout to Nunzio’s!), are downright fine foods and deserve distinction. So let’s mount a defense of pizza, here and now. In these times, we need as much joy as we can grab, and if it comes by the slice, all the better.


Why is pizza so damn vilified?

Maybe you’ve seen the near constant stream of corporate body shaming campaigns and internet memes deeming the COVID-19 crisis a mass fattening, rather than the pulmonary pandemic that is killing people by the hundreds and thousands each day. If you haven’t, I envy you.

The self-flagellation is getting old. Human beings cannot exist without calories, and some humans require more calories than others, and quarantine is the perfect time to make peace with this concept. If there is an ideal moment to enjoy the food you eat and be comforted by it, it’s weeks deep into these stay-at-home orders.

One food myth that has always chapped my ass is the notion that eating pizza is the enemy of health. I’m an Italian American, and the tendency to classify pizza as some major, sinful indulgence just gets on my nerves, especially because pizza, when prepared almost everywhere except major chain restaurants, isn’t all that horrifically unhealthy.

As immigration to the U.S. from impoverished Southern Italy soared in the early 20th century (right around the time the world was recovering from the 1918 pandemic), American pizza was born. Though once an ethnic Italian dish, it eventually became an emblem of New York’s working-class melting pot, enjoyed by just about everyone. Now, of course, it’s also mass-produced by huge corporations who have entire supply chains dedicated to keeping markups—and preservative content—high.

Those corporate pizzas (and the corporate ad dollars that keep them top of mind) taint our overall view of this very important food group. The rich culinary history of pizza is unfairly rolled into a narrow category of super-caloric pies, flattening all its nuance. Mind you, there’s a time and a place for fast food pizza, too, grease and all. But the more storied varieties, many of which I grew up eating in New York City (shoutout to Nunzio’s!), are downright fine foods and deserve distinction. So let’s mount a defense of pizza, here and now. In these times, we need as much joy as we can grab, and if it comes by the slice, all the better.


Why is pizza so damn vilified?

Maybe you’ve seen the near constant stream of corporate body shaming campaigns and internet memes deeming the COVID-19 crisis a mass fattening, rather than the pulmonary pandemic that is killing people by the hundreds and thousands each day. If you haven’t, I envy you.

The self-flagellation is getting old. Human beings cannot exist without calories, and some humans require more calories than others, and quarantine is the perfect time to make peace with this concept. If there is an ideal moment to enjoy the food you eat and be comforted by it, it’s weeks deep into these stay-at-home orders.

One food myth that has always chapped my ass is the notion that eating pizza is the enemy of health. I’m an Italian American, and the tendency to classify pizza as some major, sinful indulgence just gets on my nerves, especially because pizza, when prepared almost everywhere except major chain restaurants, isn’t all that horrifically unhealthy.

As immigration to the U.S. from impoverished Southern Italy soared in the early 20th century (right around the time the world was recovering from the 1918 pandemic), American pizza was born. Though once an ethnic Italian dish, it eventually became an emblem of New York’s working-class melting pot, enjoyed by just about everyone. Now, of course, it’s also mass-produced by huge corporations who have entire supply chains dedicated to keeping markups—and preservative content—high.

Those corporate pizzas (and the corporate ad dollars that keep them top of mind) taint our overall view of this very important food group. The rich culinary history of pizza is unfairly rolled into a narrow category of super-caloric pies, flattening all its nuance. Mind you, there’s a time and a place for fast food pizza, too, grease and all. But the more storied varieties, many of which I grew up eating in New York City (shoutout to Nunzio’s!), are downright fine foods and deserve distinction. So let’s mount a defense of pizza, here and now. In these times, we need as much joy as we can grab, and if it comes by the slice, all the better.