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Anthony Bourdain to Produce History of Food Waste Film

Anthony Bourdain to Produce History of Food Waste Film


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This documentary will show the ramifications of wasting 1.3 tons of food every year

This film addresses “one of the greatest problems of the 21st Century.”

Anthony Bourdain has been on a roll recently with projects including his CNN series, Parts Unknown; a new book, Appetites: A Cookbook; and a country-wide speaking tour. His latest project is the production of a documentary called Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, which will focus on how food waste is affecting the world.

The goal of the film is to shed light on this global issue that causes tons of food to go to waste instead of ending up on the plates of those who are going hungry.

“Chefs have been at the cutting edge of efforts to contend responsibly with the problem of food waste, perhaps because they, more than others, are painfully aware of the egregious volume of perfectly usable, nutritious food that could otherwise feed people in need, being thrown out in our restaurants," Bourdain explained in a press release.

The film, co-directed by Emmy Award-winning filmmakers Nari Kye and Anna Chai, will feature fellow celebrity chefs Massimo Bottura, Dan Barber, and Danny Bowien, according to First We Feast.


A review of the food documentary, “Wasted! The Story of Food Waste”

I just watched a compelling documentary on Amazon Prime regarding food waste. Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, is a Film by Anna Chai and Nari Kye, and is narrated by the one and only, Chef Anthony Bourdain.

Food waste in this country is a serious problem. It’s a topic we sweep under the rug. Not only is food waste contributing to starvation in this country, but it’s polluting the air we breath more than Carbon monoxide.

Let’s put some of the facts in perspective. The below is content taken directly from the Wasted! The Story of Food Waste press kit:

“Can you imagine if every time you opened your wallet, a third of your cash fell out – and you did nothing about it? Consider the fact that one-third of the food grown annually for human consumption is never eaten – for one reason or another, it ends up in the garbage. T hat’s $218 billion – or 1.3 billion tons – of food annually. In America, families chuck about 25% of the food and beverages they buy at a cost of $1,365 to $2,275 annually. Yet at the same time, 800 million people around the globe are starving. It’s a problem – but one with no shortage of solutions.

The Rockefeller Foundation supported Zero Point Zero Films and Anthony Bourdain to expose the magnitude of this problem globally, while showing simple changes we can all make to eat more and waste less. WASTED! The Story of Food Waste stars chef-heroes like Bourdain, Dan Barber, Mario Batali, Massimo Bottura, and Danny Bowien, and shows how any action — no matter how small — can lead to new ways of using more food, feeding more people, curbing environmental damage, stimulating technology and business, and ultimately improving the health and well-being of all citizens worldwide.”

Food waste is something I never really thought of until I started volunteering weekly at The LA Kitchen. The LA Kitchen is a non-profit organization that specializes in creating plant-based meals from local produce donating by various companies. We don’t waste anything in the kitchen. Items are put into recycling, trash, or compost bins. It is a practice that is mandatory in the kitchen.

After watching this film, I was disgusted on how much we waste food across the world. I had no idea that 90% of U.S. food waste ends up in landfills, where it creates large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas which is far worse than CO2. Did you know that it can take up to 25 years for one head of lettuce to decompose in a landfill? 25 years! WTH? Why isn’t anyone talking about this?

I started thinking about what can I do in my home to prevent less food waste? Believe it or not, there are some straightforward things the average person can do on a local level. I live in an apartment building, so we don’t have a bin for compost. However, there are drop off sites around Los Angeles where you can take your compostable items and donate. For homeowners, your Green trash bins typically don’t allow you to put food waste, but you can call The Department of Public Works, LA County and ask them how you go about getting rid of food waste for composting. It doesn’t take that much of an effort to help. If you have time to look at Facebook and scroll through Instagram, you have the opportunity to help prevent unnecessary food waste, myself included.

What is happening around the world to help this situation you ask? South Korea, Japan, Italy and France (and other European countries) have enacted laws to prevent food waste from ending up in landfills and guess what? It’s working.

There is a beer called Toast Ale, that is made of bread scraps. Yes, bread!! It originated in the UK and is now being produced by Chelsea Craft Brewing Company in New York. The man behind this production is named Tristram Stuart. He’s been fighting the food waste problem for 15 years.

Chef Dan Barber runs the Blue Hill restaurant in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in the Hudson Valley and is another advocate in un-wasting food. Chef Dan treats his produce like meat farm-to-table concept. He utilizes all the produce, no matter what it looks like, and creates fantastic dishes for his restaurant.

In Japan, they have created an “eco-feed” slurry made from human-food waste. The slurry acts as a probiotic and is available to pig farmers who are saving money and raising delicious pork products.

There’s a school in New Orleans that teach children composting fundamentals and growing food at school and shows that if the children are involved in the process of producing food, they are more open to trying those fruits and veggies they have grown!

I can go on-and-on about this subject. Just watch the film. Let it sink in. Take action, even in the smallest form. Recognize that we all play a part in everyday food waste whether you want to admit it or not. It’s time for a change, even in the smallest efforts. Some effort is better than no effort in my opinion.


A review of the food documentary, “Wasted! The Story of Food Waste”

I just watched a compelling documentary on Amazon Prime regarding food waste. Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, is a Film by Anna Chai and Nari Kye, and is narrated by the one and only, Chef Anthony Bourdain.

Food waste in this country is a serious problem. It’s a topic we sweep under the rug. Not only is food waste contributing to starvation in this country, but it’s polluting the air we breath more than Carbon monoxide.

Let’s put some of the facts in perspective. The below is content taken directly from the Wasted! The Story of Food Waste press kit:

“Can you imagine if every time you opened your wallet, a third of your cash fell out – and you did nothing about it? Consider the fact that one-third of the food grown annually for human consumption is never eaten – for one reason or another, it ends up in the garbage. T hat’s $218 billion – or 1.3 billion tons – of food annually. In America, families chuck about 25% of the food and beverages they buy at a cost of $1,365 to $2,275 annually. Yet at the same time, 800 million people around the globe are starving. It’s a problem – but one with no shortage of solutions.

The Rockefeller Foundation supported Zero Point Zero Films and Anthony Bourdain to expose the magnitude of this problem globally, while showing simple changes we can all make to eat more and waste less. WASTED! The Story of Food Waste stars chef-heroes like Bourdain, Dan Barber, Mario Batali, Massimo Bottura, and Danny Bowien, and shows how any action — no matter how small — can lead to new ways of using more food, feeding more people, curbing environmental damage, stimulating technology and business, and ultimately improving the health and well-being of all citizens worldwide.”

Food waste is something I never really thought of until I started volunteering weekly at The LA Kitchen. The LA Kitchen is a non-profit organization that specializes in creating plant-based meals from local produce donating by various companies. We don’t waste anything in the kitchen. Items are put into recycling, trash, or compost bins. It is a practice that is mandatory in the kitchen.

After watching this film, I was disgusted on how much we waste food across the world. I had no idea that 90% of U.S. food waste ends up in landfills, where it creates large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas which is far worse than CO2. Did you know that it can take up to 25 years for one head of lettuce to decompose in a landfill? 25 years! WTH? Why isn’t anyone talking about this?

I started thinking about what can I do in my home to prevent less food waste? Believe it or not, there are some straightforward things the average person can do on a local level. I live in an apartment building, so we don’t have a bin for compost. However, there are drop off sites around Los Angeles where you can take your compostable items and donate. For homeowners, your Green trash bins typically don’t allow you to put food waste, but you can call The Department of Public Works, LA County and ask them how you go about getting rid of food waste for composting. It doesn’t take that much of an effort to help. If you have time to look at Facebook and scroll through Instagram, you have the opportunity to help prevent unnecessary food waste, myself included.

What is happening around the world to help this situation you ask? South Korea, Japan, Italy and France (and other European countries) have enacted laws to prevent food waste from ending up in landfills and guess what? It’s working.

There is a beer called Toast Ale, that is made of bread scraps. Yes, bread!! It originated in the UK and is now being produced by Chelsea Craft Brewing Company in New York. The man behind this production is named Tristram Stuart. He’s been fighting the food waste problem for 15 years.

Chef Dan Barber runs the Blue Hill restaurant in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in the Hudson Valley and is another advocate in un-wasting food. Chef Dan treats his produce like meat farm-to-table concept. He utilizes all the produce, no matter what it looks like, and creates fantastic dishes for his restaurant.

In Japan, they have created an “eco-feed” slurry made from human-food waste. The slurry acts as a probiotic and is available to pig farmers who are saving money and raising delicious pork products.

There’s a school in New Orleans that teach children composting fundamentals and growing food at school and shows that if the children are involved in the process of producing food, they are more open to trying those fruits and veggies they have grown!

I can go on-and-on about this subject. Just watch the film. Let it sink in. Take action, even in the smallest form. Recognize that we all play a part in everyday food waste whether you want to admit it or not. It’s time for a change, even in the smallest efforts. Some effort is better than no effort in my opinion.


A review of the food documentary, “Wasted! The Story of Food Waste”

I just watched a compelling documentary on Amazon Prime regarding food waste. Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, is a Film by Anna Chai and Nari Kye, and is narrated by the one and only, Chef Anthony Bourdain.

Food waste in this country is a serious problem. It’s a topic we sweep under the rug. Not only is food waste contributing to starvation in this country, but it’s polluting the air we breath more than Carbon monoxide.

Let’s put some of the facts in perspective. The below is content taken directly from the Wasted! The Story of Food Waste press kit:

“Can you imagine if every time you opened your wallet, a third of your cash fell out – and you did nothing about it? Consider the fact that one-third of the food grown annually for human consumption is never eaten – for one reason or another, it ends up in the garbage. T hat’s $218 billion – or 1.3 billion tons – of food annually. In America, families chuck about 25% of the food and beverages they buy at a cost of $1,365 to $2,275 annually. Yet at the same time, 800 million people around the globe are starving. It’s a problem – but one with no shortage of solutions.

The Rockefeller Foundation supported Zero Point Zero Films and Anthony Bourdain to expose the magnitude of this problem globally, while showing simple changes we can all make to eat more and waste less. WASTED! The Story of Food Waste stars chef-heroes like Bourdain, Dan Barber, Mario Batali, Massimo Bottura, and Danny Bowien, and shows how any action — no matter how small — can lead to new ways of using more food, feeding more people, curbing environmental damage, stimulating technology and business, and ultimately improving the health and well-being of all citizens worldwide.”

Food waste is something I never really thought of until I started volunteering weekly at The LA Kitchen. The LA Kitchen is a non-profit organization that specializes in creating plant-based meals from local produce donating by various companies. We don’t waste anything in the kitchen. Items are put into recycling, trash, or compost bins. It is a practice that is mandatory in the kitchen.

After watching this film, I was disgusted on how much we waste food across the world. I had no idea that 90% of U.S. food waste ends up in landfills, where it creates large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas which is far worse than CO2. Did you know that it can take up to 25 years for one head of lettuce to decompose in a landfill? 25 years! WTH? Why isn’t anyone talking about this?

I started thinking about what can I do in my home to prevent less food waste? Believe it or not, there are some straightforward things the average person can do on a local level. I live in an apartment building, so we don’t have a bin for compost. However, there are drop off sites around Los Angeles where you can take your compostable items and donate. For homeowners, your Green trash bins typically don’t allow you to put food waste, but you can call The Department of Public Works, LA County and ask them how you go about getting rid of food waste for composting. It doesn’t take that much of an effort to help. If you have time to look at Facebook and scroll through Instagram, you have the opportunity to help prevent unnecessary food waste, myself included.

What is happening around the world to help this situation you ask? South Korea, Japan, Italy and France (and other European countries) have enacted laws to prevent food waste from ending up in landfills and guess what? It’s working.

There is a beer called Toast Ale, that is made of bread scraps. Yes, bread!! It originated in the UK and is now being produced by Chelsea Craft Brewing Company in New York. The man behind this production is named Tristram Stuart. He’s been fighting the food waste problem for 15 years.

Chef Dan Barber runs the Blue Hill restaurant in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in the Hudson Valley and is another advocate in un-wasting food. Chef Dan treats his produce like meat farm-to-table concept. He utilizes all the produce, no matter what it looks like, and creates fantastic dishes for his restaurant.

In Japan, they have created an “eco-feed” slurry made from human-food waste. The slurry acts as a probiotic and is available to pig farmers who are saving money and raising delicious pork products.

There’s a school in New Orleans that teach children composting fundamentals and growing food at school and shows that if the children are involved in the process of producing food, they are more open to trying those fruits and veggies they have grown!

I can go on-and-on about this subject. Just watch the film. Let it sink in. Take action, even in the smallest form. Recognize that we all play a part in everyday food waste whether you want to admit it or not. It’s time for a change, even in the smallest efforts. Some effort is better than no effort in my opinion.


A review of the food documentary, “Wasted! The Story of Food Waste”

I just watched a compelling documentary on Amazon Prime regarding food waste. Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, is a Film by Anna Chai and Nari Kye, and is narrated by the one and only, Chef Anthony Bourdain.

Food waste in this country is a serious problem. It’s a topic we sweep under the rug. Not only is food waste contributing to starvation in this country, but it’s polluting the air we breath more than Carbon monoxide.

Let’s put some of the facts in perspective. The below is content taken directly from the Wasted! The Story of Food Waste press kit:

“Can you imagine if every time you opened your wallet, a third of your cash fell out – and you did nothing about it? Consider the fact that one-third of the food grown annually for human consumption is never eaten – for one reason or another, it ends up in the garbage. T hat’s $218 billion – or 1.3 billion tons – of food annually. In America, families chuck about 25% of the food and beverages they buy at a cost of $1,365 to $2,275 annually. Yet at the same time, 800 million people around the globe are starving. It’s a problem – but one with no shortage of solutions.

The Rockefeller Foundation supported Zero Point Zero Films and Anthony Bourdain to expose the magnitude of this problem globally, while showing simple changes we can all make to eat more and waste less. WASTED! The Story of Food Waste stars chef-heroes like Bourdain, Dan Barber, Mario Batali, Massimo Bottura, and Danny Bowien, and shows how any action — no matter how small — can lead to new ways of using more food, feeding more people, curbing environmental damage, stimulating technology and business, and ultimately improving the health and well-being of all citizens worldwide.”

Food waste is something I never really thought of until I started volunteering weekly at The LA Kitchen. The LA Kitchen is a non-profit organization that specializes in creating plant-based meals from local produce donating by various companies. We don’t waste anything in the kitchen. Items are put into recycling, trash, or compost bins. It is a practice that is mandatory in the kitchen.

After watching this film, I was disgusted on how much we waste food across the world. I had no idea that 90% of U.S. food waste ends up in landfills, where it creates large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas which is far worse than CO2. Did you know that it can take up to 25 years for one head of lettuce to decompose in a landfill? 25 years! WTH? Why isn’t anyone talking about this?

I started thinking about what can I do in my home to prevent less food waste? Believe it or not, there are some straightforward things the average person can do on a local level. I live in an apartment building, so we don’t have a bin for compost. However, there are drop off sites around Los Angeles where you can take your compostable items and donate. For homeowners, your Green trash bins typically don’t allow you to put food waste, but you can call The Department of Public Works, LA County and ask them how you go about getting rid of food waste for composting. It doesn’t take that much of an effort to help. If you have time to look at Facebook and scroll through Instagram, you have the opportunity to help prevent unnecessary food waste, myself included.

What is happening around the world to help this situation you ask? South Korea, Japan, Italy and France (and other European countries) have enacted laws to prevent food waste from ending up in landfills and guess what? It’s working.

There is a beer called Toast Ale, that is made of bread scraps. Yes, bread!! It originated in the UK and is now being produced by Chelsea Craft Brewing Company in New York. The man behind this production is named Tristram Stuart. He’s been fighting the food waste problem for 15 years.

Chef Dan Barber runs the Blue Hill restaurant in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in the Hudson Valley and is another advocate in un-wasting food. Chef Dan treats his produce like meat farm-to-table concept. He utilizes all the produce, no matter what it looks like, and creates fantastic dishes for his restaurant.

In Japan, they have created an “eco-feed” slurry made from human-food waste. The slurry acts as a probiotic and is available to pig farmers who are saving money and raising delicious pork products.

There’s a school in New Orleans that teach children composting fundamentals and growing food at school and shows that if the children are involved in the process of producing food, they are more open to trying those fruits and veggies they have grown!

I can go on-and-on about this subject. Just watch the film. Let it sink in. Take action, even in the smallest form. Recognize that we all play a part in everyday food waste whether you want to admit it or not. It’s time for a change, even in the smallest efforts. Some effort is better than no effort in my opinion.


A review of the food documentary, “Wasted! The Story of Food Waste”

I just watched a compelling documentary on Amazon Prime regarding food waste. Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, is a Film by Anna Chai and Nari Kye, and is narrated by the one and only, Chef Anthony Bourdain.

Food waste in this country is a serious problem. It’s a topic we sweep under the rug. Not only is food waste contributing to starvation in this country, but it’s polluting the air we breath more than Carbon monoxide.

Let’s put some of the facts in perspective. The below is content taken directly from the Wasted! The Story of Food Waste press kit:

“Can you imagine if every time you opened your wallet, a third of your cash fell out – and you did nothing about it? Consider the fact that one-third of the food grown annually for human consumption is never eaten – for one reason or another, it ends up in the garbage. T hat’s $218 billion – or 1.3 billion tons – of food annually. In America, families chuck about 25% of the food and beverages they buy at a cost of $1,365 to $2,275 annually. Yet at the same time, 800 million people around the globe are starving. It’s a problem – but one with no shortage of solutions.

The Rockefeller Foundation supported Zero Point Zero Films and Anthony Bourdain to expose the magnitude of this problem globally, while showing simple changes we can all make to eat more and waste less. WASTED! The Story of Food Waste stars chef-heroes like Bourdain, Dan Barber, Mario Batali, Massimo Bottura, and Danny Bowien, and shows how any action — no matter how small — can lead to new ways of using more food, feeding more people, curbing environmental damage, stimulating technology and business, and ultimately improving the health and well-being of all citizens worldwide.”

Food waste is something I never really thought of until I started volunteering weekly at The LA Kitchen. The LA Kitchen is a non-profit organization that specializes in creating plant-based meals from local produce donating by various companies. We don’t waste anything in the kitchen. Items are put into recycling, trash, or compost bins. It is a practice that is mandatory in the kitchen.

After watching this film, I was disgusted on how much we waste food across the world. I had no idea that 90% of U.S. food waste ends up in landfills, where it creates large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas which is far worse than CO2. Did you know that it can take up to 25 years for one head of lettuce to decompose in a landfill? 25 years! WTH? Why isn’t anyone talking about this?

I started thinking about what can I do in my home to prevent less food waste? Believe it or not, there are some straightforward things the average person can do on a local level. I live in an apartment building, so we don’t have a bin for compost. However, there are drop off sites around Los Angeles where you can take your compostable items and donate. For homeowners, your Green trash bins typically don’t allow you to put food waste, but you can call The Department of Public Works, LA County and ask them how you go about getting rid of food waste for composting. It doesn’t take that much of an effort to help. If you have time to look at Facebook and scroll through Instagram, you have the opportunity to help prevent unnecessary food waste, myself included.

What is happening around the world to help this situation you ask? South Korea, Japan, Italy and France (and other European countries) have enacted laws to prevent food waste from ending up in landfills and guess what? It’s working.

There is a beer called Toast Ale, that is made of bread scraps. Yes, bread!! It originated in the UK and is now being produced by Chelsea Craft Brewing Company in New York. The man behind this production is named Tristram Stuart. He’s been fighting the food waste problem for 15 years.

Chef Dan Barber runs the Blue Hill restaurant in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in the Hudson Valley and is another advocate in un-wasting food. Chef Dan treats his produce like meat farm-to-table concept. He utilizes all the produce, no matter what it looks like, and creates fantastic dishes for his restaurant.

In Japan, they have created an “eco-feed” slurry made from human-food waste. The slurry acts as a probiotic and is available to pig farmers who are saving money and raising delicious pork products.

There’s a school in New Orleans that teach children composting fundamentals and growing food at school and shows that if the children are involved in the process of producing food, they are more open to trying those fruits and veggies they have grown!

I can go on-and-on about this subject. Just watch the film. Let it sink in. Take action, even in the smallest form. Recognize that we all play a part in everyday food waste whether you want to admit it or not. It’s time for a change, even in the smallest efforts. Some effort is better than no effort in my opinion.


A review of the food documentary, “Wasted! The Story of Food Waste”

I just watched a compelling documentary on Amazon Prime regarding food waste. Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, is a Film by Anna Chai and Nari Kye, and is narrated by the one and only, Chef Anthony Bourdain.

Food waste in this country is a serious problem. It’s a topic we sweep under the rug. Not only is food waste contributing to starvation in this country, but it’s polluting the air we breath more than Carbon monoxide.

Let’s put some of the facts in perspective. The below is content taken directly from the Wasted! The Story of Food Waste press kit:

“Can you imagine if every time you opened your wallet, a third of your cash fell out – and you did nothing about it? Consider the fact that one-third of the food grown annually for human consumption is never eaten – for one reason or another, it ends up in the garbage. T hat’s $218 billion – or 1.3 billion tons – of food annually. In America, families chuck about 25% of the food and beverages they buy at a cost of $1,365 to $2,275 annually. Yet at the same time, 800 million people around the globe are starving. It’s a problem – but one with no shortage of solutions.

The Rockefeller Foundation supported Zero Point Zero Films and Anthony Bourdain to expose the magnitude of this problem globally, while showing simple changes we can all make to eat more and waste less. WASTED! The Story of Food Waste stars chef-heroes like Bourdain, Dan Barber, Mario Batali, Massimo Bottura, and Danny Bowien, and shows how any action — no matter how small — can lead to new ways of using more food, feeding more people, curbing environmental damage, stimulating technology and business, and ultimately improving the health and well-being of all citizens worldwide.”

Food waste is something I never really thought of until I started volunteering weekly at The LA Kitchen. The LA Kitchen is a non-profit organization that specializes in creating plant-based meals from local produce donating by various companies. We don’t waste anything in the kitchen. Items are put into recycling, trash, or compost bins. It is a practice that is mandatory in the kitchen.

After watching this film, I was disgusted on how much we waste food across the world. I had no idea that 90% of U.S. food waste ends up in landfills, where it creates large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas which is far worse than CO2. Did you know that it can take up to 25 years for one head of lettuce to decompose in a landfill? 25 years! WTH? Why isn’t anyone talking about this?

I started thinking about what can I do in my home to prevent less food waste? Believe it or not, there are some straightforward things the average person can do on a local level. I live in an apartment building, so we don’t have a bin for compost. However, there are drop off sites around Los Angeles where you can take your compostable items and donate. For homeowners, your Green trash bins typically don’t allow you to put food waste, but you can call The Department of Public Works, LA County and ask them how you go about getting rid of food waste for composting. It doesn’t take that much of an effort to help. If you have time to look at Facebook and scroll through Instagram, you have the opportunity to help prevent unnecessary food waste, myself included.

What is happening around the world to help this situation you ask? South Korea, Japan, Italy and France (and other European countries) have enacted laws to prevent food waste from ending up in landfills and guess what? It’s working.

There is a beer called Toast Ale, that is made of bread scraps. Yes, bread!! It originated in the UK and is now being produced by Chelsea Craft Brewing Company in New York. The man behind this production is named Tristram Stuart. He’s been fighting the food waste problem for 15 years.

Chef Dan Barber runs the Blue Hill restaurant in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in the Hudson Valley and is another advocate in un-wasting food. Chef Dan treats his produce like meat farm-to-table concept. He utilizes all the produce, no matter what it looks like, and creates fantastic dishes for his restaurant.

In Japan, they have created an “eco-feed” slurry made from human-food waste. The slurry acts as a probiotic and is available to pig farmers who are saving money and raising delicious pork products.

There’s a school in New Orleans that teach children composting fundamentals and growing food at school and shows that if the children are involved in the process of producing food, they are more open to trying those fruits and veggies they have grown!

I can go on-and-on about this subject. Just watch the film. Let it sink in. Take action, even in the smallest form. Recognize that we all play a part in everyday food waste whether you want to admit it or not. It’s time for a change, even in the smallest efforts. Some effort is better than no effort in my opinion.


A review of the food documentary, “Wasted! The Story of Food Waste”

I just watched a compelling documentary on Amazon Prime regarding food waste. Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, is a Film by Anna Chai and Nari Kye, and is narrated by the one and only, Chef Anthony Bourdain.

Food waste in this country is a serious problem. It’s a topic we sweep under the rug. Not only is food waste contributing to starvation in this country, but it’s polluting the air we breath more than Carbon monoxide.

Let’s put some of the facts in perspective. The below is content taken directly from the Wasted! The Story of Food Waste press kit:

“Can you imagine if every time you opened your wallet, a third of your cash fell out – and you did nothing about it? Consider the fact that one-third of the food grown annually for human consumption is never eaten – for one reason or another, it ends up in the garbage. T hat’s $218 billion – or 1.3 billion tons – of food annually. In America, families chuck about 25% of the food and beverages they buy at a cost of $1,365 to $2,275 annually. Yet at the same time, 800 million people around the globe are starving. It’s a problem – but one with no shortage of solutions.

The Rockefeller Foundation supported Zero Point Zero Films and Anthony Bourdain to expose the magnitude of this problem globally, while showing simple changes we can all make to eat more and waste less. WASTED! The Story of Food Waste stars chef-heroes like Bourdain, Dan Barber, Mario Batali, Massimo Bottura, and Danny Bowien, and shows how any action — no matter how small — can lead to new ways of using more food, feeding more people, curbing environmental damage, stimulating technology and business, and ultimately improving the health and well-being of all citizens worldwide.”

Food waste is something I never really thought of until I started volunteering weekly at The LA Kitchen. The LA Kitchen is a non-profit organization that specializes in creating plant-based meals from local produce donating by various companies. We don’t waste anything in the kitchen. Items are put into recycling, trash, or compost bins. It is a practice that is mandatory in the kitchen.

After watching this film, I was disgusted on how much we waste food across the world. I had no idea that 90% of U.S. food waste ends up in landfills, where it creates large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas which is far worse than CO2. Did you know that it can take up to 25 years for one head of lettuce to decompose in a landfill? 25 years! WTH? Why isn’t anyone talking about this?

I started thinking about what can I do in my home to prevent less food waste? Believe it or not, there are some straightforward things the average person can do on a local level. I live in an apartment building, so we don’t have a bin for compost. However, there are drop off sites around Los Angeles where you can take your compostable items and donate. For homeowners, your Green trash bins typically don’t allow you to put food waste, but you can call The Department of Public Works, LA County and ask them how you go about getting rid of food waste for composting. It doesn’t take that much of an effort to help. If you have time to look at Facebook and scroll through Instagram, you have the opportunity to help prevent unnecessary food waste, myself included.

What is happening around the world to help this situation you ask? South Korea, Japan, Italy and France (and other European countries) have enacted laws to prevent food waste from ending up in landfills and guess what? It’s working.

There is a beer called Toast Ale, that is made of bread scraps. Yes, bread!! It originated in the UK and is now being produced by Chelsea Craft Brewing Company in New York. The man behind this production is named Tristram Stuart. He’s been fighting the food waste problem for 15 years.

Chef Dan Barber runs the Blue Hill restaurant in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in the Hudson Valley and is another advocate in un-wasting food. Chef Dan treats his produce like meat farm-to-table concept. He utilizes all the produce, no matter what it looks like, and creates fantastic dishes for his restaurant.

In Japan, they have created an “eco-feed” slurry made from human-food waste. The slurry acts as a probiotic and is available to pig farmers who are saving money and raising delicious pork products.

There’s a school in New Orleans that teach children composting fundamentals and growing food at school and shows that if the children are involved in the process of producing food, they are more open to trying those fruits and veggies they have grown!

I can go on-and-on about this subject. Just watch the film. Let it sink in. Take action, even in the smallest form. Recognize that we all play a part in everyday food waste whether you want to admit it or not. It’s time for a change, even in the smallest efforts. Some effort is better than no effort in my opinion.


A review of the food documentary, “Wasted! The Story of Food Waste”

I just watched a compelling documentary on Amazon Prime regarding food waste. Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, is a Film by Anna Chai and Nari Kye, and is narrated by the one and only, Chef Anthony Bourdain.

Food waste in this country is a serious problem. It’s a topic we sweep under the rug. Not only is food waste contributing to starvation in this country, but it’s polluting the air we breath more than Carbon monoxide.

Let’s put some of the facts in perspective. The below is content taken directly from the Wasted! The Story of Food Waste press kit:

“Can you imagine if every time you opened your wallet, a third of your cash fell out – and you did nothing about it? Consider the fact that one-third of the food grown annually for human consumption is never eaten – for one reason or another, it ends up in the garbage. T hat’s $218 billion – or 1.3 billion tons – of food annually. In America, families chuck about 25% of the food and beverages they buy at a cost of $1,365 to $2,275 annually. Yet at the same time, 800 million people around the globe are starving. It’s a problem – but one with no shortage of solutions.

The Rockefeller Foundation supported Zero Point Zero Films and Anthony Bourdain to expose the magnitude of this problem globally, while showing simple changes we can all make to eat more and waste less. WASTED! The Story of Food Waste stars chef-heroes like Bourdain, Dan Barber, Mario Batali, Massimo Bottura, and Danny Bowien, and shows how any action — no matter how small — can lead to new ways of using more food, feeding more people, curbing environmental damage, stimulating technology and business, and ultimately improving the health and well-being of all citizens worldwide.”

Food waste is something I never really thought of until I started volunteering weekly at The LA Kitchen. The LA Kitchen is a non-profit organization that specializes in creating plant-based meals from local produce donating by various companies. We don’t waste anything in the kitchen. Items are put into recycling, trash, or compost bins. It is a practice that is mandatory in the kitchen.

After watching this film, I was disgusted on how much we waste food across the world. I had no idea that 90% of U.S. food waste ends up in landfills, where it creates large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas which is far worse than CO2. Did you know that it can take up to 25 years for one head of lettuce to decompose in a landfill? 25 years! WTH? Why isn’t anyone talking about this?

I started thinking about what can I do in my home to prevent less food waste? Believe it or not, there are some straightforward things the average person can do on a local level. I live in an apartment building, so we don’t have a bin for compost. However, there are drop off sites around Los Angeles where you can take your compostable items and donate. For homeowners, your Green trash bins typically don’t allow you to put food waste, but you can call The Department of Public Works, LA County and ask them how you go about getting rid of food waste for composting. It doesn’t take that much of an effort to help. If you have time to look at Facebook and scroll through Instagram, you have the opportunity to help prevent unnecessary food waste, myself included.

What is happening around the world to help this situation you ask? South Korea, Japan, Italy and France (and other European countries) have enacted laws to prevent food waste from ending up in landfills and guess what? It’s working.

There is a beer called Toast Ale, that is made of bread scraps. Yes, bread!! It originated in the UK and is now being produced by Chelsea Craft Brewing Company in New York. The man behind this production is named Tristram Stuart. He’s been fighting the food waste problem for 15 years.

Chef Dan Barber runs the Blue Hill restaurant in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in the Hudson Valley and is another advocate in un-wasting food. Chef Dan treats his produce like meat farm-to-table concept. He utilizes all the produce, no matter what it looks like, and creates fantastic dishes for his restaurant.

In Japan, they have created an “eco-feed” slurry made from human-food waste. The slurry acts as a probiotic and is available to pig farmers who are saving money and raising delicious pork products.

There’s a school in New Orleans that teach children composting fundamentals and growing food at school and shows that if the children are involved in the process of producing food, they are more open to trying those fruits and veggies they have grown!

I can go on-and-on about this subject. Just watch the film. Let it sink in. Take action, even in the smallest form. Recognize that we all play a part in everyday food waste whether you want to admit it or not. It’s time for a change, even in the smallest efforts. Some effort is better than no effort in my opinion.


A review of the food documentary, “Wasted! The Story of Food Waste”

I just watched a compelling documentary on Amazon Prime regarding food waste. Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, is a Film by Anna Chai and Nari Kye, and is narrated by the one and only, Chef Anthony Bourdain.

Food waste in this country is a serious problem. It’s a topic we sweep under the rug. Not only is food waste contributing to starvation in this country, but it’s polluting the air we breath more than Carbon monoxide.

Let’s put some of the facts in perspective. The below is content taken directly from the Wasted! The Story of Food Waste press kit:

“Can you imagine if every time you opened your wallet, a third of your cash fell out – and you did nothing about it? Consider the fact that one-third of the food grown annually for human consumption is never eaten – for one reason or another, it ends up in the garbage. T hat’s $218 billion – or 1.3 billion tons – of food annually. In America, families chuck about 25% of the food and beverages they buy at a cost of $1,365 to $2,275 annually. Yet at the same time, 800 million people around the globe are starving. It’s a problem – but one with no shortage of solutions.

The Rockefeller Foundation supported Zero Point Zero Films and Anthony Bourdain to expose the magnitude of this problem globally, while showing simple changes we can all make to eat more and waste less. WASTED! The Story of Food Waste stars chef-heroes like Bourdain, Dan Barber, Mario Batali, Massimo Bottura, and Danny Bowien, and shows how any action — no matter how small — can lead to new ways of using more food, feeding more people, curbing environmental damage, stimulating technology and business, and ultimately improving the health and well-being of all citizens worldwide.”

Food waste is something I never really thought of until I started volunteering weekly at The LA Kitchen. The LA Kitchen is a non-profit organization that specializes in creating plant-based meals from local produce donating by various companies. We don’t waste anything in the kitchen. Items are put into recycling, trash, or compost bins. It is a practice that is mandatory in the kitchen.

After watching this film, I was disgusted on how much we waste food across the world. I had no idea that 90% of U.S. food waste ends up in landfills, where it creates large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas which is far worse than CO2. Did you know that it can take up to 25 years for one head of lettuce to decompose in a landfill? 25 years! WTH? Why isn’t anyone talking about this?

I started thinking about what can I do in my home to prevent less food waste? Believe it or not, there are some straightforward things the average person can do on a local level. I live in an apartment building, so we don’t have a bin for compost. However, there are drop off sites around Los Angeles where you can take your compostable items and donate. For homeowners, your Green trash bins typically don’t allow you to put food waste, but you can call The Department of Public Works, LA County and ask them how you go about getting rid of food waste for composting. It doesn’t take that much of an effort to help. If you have time to look at Facebook and scroll through Instagram, you have the opportunity to help prevent unnecessary food waste, myself included.

What is happening around the world to help this situation you ask? South Korea, Japan, Italy and France (and other European countries) have enacted laws to prevent food waste from ending up in landfills and guess what? It’s working.

There is a beer called Toast Ale, that is made of bread scraps. Yes, bread!! It originated in the UK and is now being produced by Chelsea Craft Brewing Company in New York. The man behind this production is named Tristram Stuart. He’s been fighting the food waste problem for 15 years.

Chef Dan Barber runs the Blue Hill restaurant in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in the Hudson Valley and is another advocate in un-wasting food. Chef Dan treats his produce like meat farm-to-table concept. He utilizes all the produce, no matter what it looks like, and creates fantastic dishes for his restaurant.

In Japan, they have created an “eco-feed” slurry made from human-food waste. The slurry acts as a probiotic and is available to pig farmers who are saving money and raising delicious pork products.

There’s a school in New Orleans that teach children composting fundamentals and growing food at school and shows that if the children are involved in the process of producing food, they are more open to trying those fruits and veggies they have grown!

I can go on-and-on about this subject. Just watch the film. Let it sink in. Take action, even in the smallest form. Recognize that we all play a part in everyday food waste whether you want to admit it or not. It’s time for a change, even in the smallest efforts. Some effort is better than no effort in my opinion.


A review of the food documentary, “Wasted! The Story of Food Waste”

I just watched a compelling documentary on Amazon Prime regarding food waste. Wasted! The Story of Food Waste, is a Film by Anna Chai and Nari Kye, and is narrated by the one and only, Chef Anthony Bourdain.

Food waste in this country is a serious problem. It’s a topic we sweep under the rug. Not only is food waste contributing to starvation in this country, but it’s polluting the air we breath more than Carbon monoxide.

Let’s put some of the facts in perspective. The below is content taken directly from the Wasted! The Story of Food Waste press kit:

“Can you imagine if every time you opened your wallet, a third of your cash fell out – and you did nothing about it? Consider the fact that one-third of the food grown annually for human consumption is never eaten – for one reason or another, it ends up in the garbage. T hat’s $218 billion – or 1.3 billion tons – of food annually. In America, families chuck about 25% of the food and beverages they buy at a cost of $1,365 to $2,275 annually. Yet at the same time, 800 million people around the globe are starving. It’s a problem – but one with no shortage of solutions.

The Rockefeller Foundation supported Zero Point Zero Films and Anthony Bourdain to expose the magnitude of this problem globally, while showing simple changes we can all make to eat more and waste less. WASTED! The Story of Food Waste stars chef-heroes like Bourdain, Dan Barber, Mario Batali, Massimo Bottura, and Danny Bowien, and shows how any action — no matter how small — can lead to new ways of using more food, feeding more people, curbing environmental damage, stimulating technology and business, and ultimately improving the health and well-being of all citizens worldwide.”

Food waste is something I never really thought of until I started volunteering weekly at The LA Kitchen. The LA Kitchen is a non-profit organization that specializes in creating plant-based meals from local produce donating by various companies. We don’t waste anything in the kitchen. Items are put into recycling, trash, or compost bins. It is a practice that is mandatory in the kitchen.

After watching this film, I was disgusted on how much we waste food across the world. I had no idea that 90% of U.S. food waste ends up in landfills, where it creates large amounts of methane, a greenhouse gas which is far worse than CO2. Did you know that it can take up to 25 years for one head of lettuce to decompose in a landfill? 25 years! WTH? Why isn’t anyone talking about this?

I started thinking about what can I do in my home to prevent less food waste? Believe it or not, there are some straightforward things the average person can do on a local level. I live in an apartment building, so we don’t have a bin for compost. However, there are drop off sites around Los Angeles where you can take your compostable items and donate. For homeowners, your Green trash bins typically don’t allow you to put food waste, but you can call The Department of Public Works, LA County and ask them how you go about getting rid of food waste for composting. It doesn’t take that much of an effort to help. If you have time to look at Facebook and scroll through Instagram, you have the opportunity to help prevent unnecessary food waste, myself included.

What is happening around the world to help this situation you ask? South Korea, Japan, Italy and France (and other European countries) have enacted laws to prevent food waste from ending up in landfills and guess what? It’s working.

There is a beer called Toast Ale, that is made of bread scraps. Yes, bread!! It originated in the UK and is now being produced by Chelsea Craft Brewing Company in New York. The man behind this production is named Tristram Stuart. He’s been fighting the food waste problem for 15 years.

Chef Dan Barber runs the Blue Hill restaurant in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns in the Hudson Valley and is another advocate in un-wasting food. Chef Dan treats his produce like meat farm-to-table concept. He utilizes all the produce, no matter what it looks like, and creates fantastic dishes for his restaurant.

In Japan, they have created an “eco-feed” slurry made from human-food waste. The slurry acts as a probiotic and is available to pig farmers who are saving money and raising delicious pork products.

There’s a school in New Orleans that teach children composting fundamentals and growing food at school and shows that if the children are involved in the process of producing food, they are more open to trying those fruits and veggies they have grown!

I can go on-and-on about this subject. Just watch the film. Let it sink in. Take action, even in the smallest form. Recognize that we all play a part in everyday food waste whether you want to admit it or not. It’s time for a change, even in the smallest efforts. Some effort is better than no effort in my opinion.


Watch the video: An Anthony Bourdain documentary is in the works (May 2022).